Saturday, January 2, 2016

Clyde Garvey Rice

Clyde Garvey Rice
born;   21 NOV 1883  - Machiasport, Maine
died;   30 MAY 1962 - Northfield, Maine
married on   30 SEPT 1906  by By justice of peace Henry R. Taylor
Occupation - a Registered maine guide, trapper and farmer.
His father;  Judah Rice
His mother;  Susan Foster
He married
Etta  May  Burns
born;   27 JULY 1885 - North New Portland, Maine
died;    25 MAY 1958 - Northfield, Maine
Her Father;   Henry Burns
Her Mother;  Charlotte Amanda Welch

Clyde Garvey Rice holding three baby Black bears

Etta May Burns with Cassie A. "Young" Bagley


CHILDREN;

1.  Bernard Francis Rice
born;   20 JUNE 1907  -  Northfield, Maine
died;   31   Dec   1981 - Northfield, Maine
wife;  (never married, had live-in girlfriend)
Cassie Adelaide "Young" Bagley
born;  20  April  1900
died;  22  Nov  1968
Her Father;  Amos Westbrook Young
Her Mother;  Minnie Almira Dunbar
(Cassie was married to Asa J. Bagley)

Bernard Rice and Cassie Bagley


2.  Grace Lois Rice
born;  19 JAN 1909  - Northfield, Maine
died;  4 NOV  1986  -  Fairfield, Maine
married at West Va. in 1934
Husband
Raymond L. Anthony
born;  17  Dec  1896 - Canton, Ohio
died;  23  July  1969 - Canton, Ohio
His Father;  George L. Anthony
His Mother;  Flora J. Kapp

child 1;  (still living)

child 2;  (still living)

Grace Lois (Rice) Anthony at her home in Fairfield, Maine


Raymond L. Anthony - born and died in Canton Ohio


Notes;  Clyde and Etta lived at the Rice farmstead along route 192 in Northfield, Maine.


The farmstead was right next to the Northfield Cemetery where a number of the Rice's are buried.  The family had their own private dirt road which ran from the farmhouse to the Cemetery.  Bernard inherited the farmhouse where he Cassie lived after Etta and Clyde died.  After Bernard died the farmhouse burned down during a lightning storm.


Rice farmstead - I took this photo of the shed which served as main entrance to the house

Cassie came to the farmhouse after Clyde learned Etta was dying from cancer.  He placed an ad in the local paper and Cassie answered the ad.  She was still married to Asa J. Bagley at the time and they had several children and no one knows why she left him to move to the Rice Farmstead.
She was hired to help tend to Etta, to cook and do house keeping duties in exchange for room and board.  Cassie also had very poor eye sight and got a monthly SSI check as well.
In time Etta got so bad she became bed ridden and had to under go operations.  Clyde had to sell off a large area of land he owned over by the Northfield one room schoolhouse in order to help pay off the hospital bills.  Etta died and Cassie stayed on as a house keeper, but in time Clyde also became ill and ended up being bed ridden.  Just as she had done for Etta, Cassie tended to Clyde until he died.
Somewhere along the way Cassie and Bernard Rice had fallen in love and Cassie remained at the farmstead, but now as a live-in girlfriend of Bernard.  Cassie was always very thin and frail looking but I never saw her get angry - she always was soft spoken and offered up a smile.  Cassie always treated us kids just as if she was our grandmother.  Cassie and Asa's children often stopped by the Rice farmstead to visit her and her son Norman Bagley saw to it that Bernard and her got into Machias at least one or two times a month to shop for food.  Just like Cassie, Bernard also suffered from very poor eyesight and could not drive.
It was Cassie's wish that when she died she would be buried in the Northfield Cemetery, not far from Bernard and her wish was honnored after a battle with cancer that saw her first in the Machias hospital and later moved to the Calis hospital, where she died.


Cassie A. Bagley gravestone, Northfield, Maine

Clyde was a registered Maine Guide as was some of the other Rice's.  He loved to be out in the woods and was a very good hunter as well as a trapper.  In his lifetime Clyde shot more than his share of deer and bear. 
Etta did not like her photo taken - she always said that when she was dead and gone she didn't want people looking at her.  She also thought the earthen cellar at the Rice farmstead was haunted and did not like to go down into it.  Etta had also hoped she would of had all boys. 
Bernard loved to study his Bible and talk religion and after Cassie passed away, perhaps out of loneliness, he began inviting jehovah's witnesses to the farmstead.  They always sent two at a time and tried their damest to convert Bernard, but what they didn't know was that it was Bernard who was doing the converting and in time he ended up getting several of them to leave and become true Christians.  The group finally stopped sending people to the farmstead.
Bernard got a monthly SSI check because of his poor eyesight and made extra income several ways.  He had vast Blueberry fields and also repaired chain saws.  He collected old tools with a passion and restored them to like new condition.  He also began to repair old cast iron wood stoves. 
Besides the blueberry fields, the Rices also owned the land across route 192 which had a hunting cabin on it.  Lots were also rented in the summertime which had several converted school buses on them.  The family also owned land on nearby Eastern Ridge with yet another hunting cabin on it.  It was Bernards wish to restore all of the family land that had been sold over the years back into the family and he had restored some of those lands when he passed away.


Bernard Rice & Cassie Bagley at hunting cabin on Eastern Ridge

Bernard had a weak heart in later years and his doctor told him he had to take it easy.  On a very cold winter day the fire box ran dry and Bernard had to make hiw way out for more firewood.  After hauling in an armfull he got chest pains and went into the front parlor to lay down - he would never wake up.

Clyde Garvey Rice Registered Maine Guide papers


Bernard Francis Rice in kitchen of Rice farmstead

Bernard Francis Rice in front parlor of the Rice farmstead in Northfield, Maine


Rice farmstead - photo I took from route 192, Northfield, Maine

My mother giving Bernard Rice a hug goodbye on one of our visits to the Rice farmstead



FLYNN FAMILY GENEALOGY VIDEO


Cassie A. "Young" Bagley - photo taken by Bernard Rice

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